White House, 60 global partners launch the declaration of the future of the internet, India not on the list

The US, European Union and a host of other global partners have launched the ‘Declaration for the Future of the Internet.’ The declaration is an agreement to support future for the Internet that is an “open, free, global, interoperable, reliable, and secure.”

So far, 60 partners have endorsed the Declaration, according to a fact sheet released by the White House. Those endorsing the Declaration apart from the US include Albania, Andorra, Argentina, Australia, Austria, Belgium, Bulgaria, Cabo Verde, Canada, Colombia, Costa Rica, Croatia, Cyprus, Czech Republic, Denmark, Dominican Republic, Estonia, the European Commission , Finland, France, Georgia, Germany, Greece, Hungary, Iceland, Ireland, Israel, Italy, Jamaica, Japan, Kenya, Kosovo, Latvia, Lithuania, Luxembourg, Maldives, Malta, Marshall Islands, Micronesia, Moldova, Montenegro, Netherlands, New Zealand, Niger, Northern Macedonia, Palau, Peru, Poland, Portugal, Romania, Senegal, Serbia, Slovakia, Slovenia, Spain, Sweden, Taiwan, Trinidad and Tobago, the United Kingdom, Ukraine, and Uruguay.

According to a release by the European Commission, more countries are expected to follow suit in the coming weeks. The signatories do not include India.

“Globally, we are witnessing a trend of rising digital authoritarianism where some states act to repress freedom of expression, censor independent news sites, interfere with elections, promote disinformation, and deny their citizens other human rights. At the same time, millions of people still face barriers to access and cybersecurity risks and threats undermine the trust and reliability of networks, ”the White House said in a statement.

According to the statement, the Declaration represents a political commitment among the partners to advance a “positive vision for the Internet and digital technologies.”

The Declaration’s principles include commitments to protect human rights and fundamental freedoms of all people, promote a global Internet that advances the free flow of information, advancing “inclusive and affordable” connectivity, promote trust in the global digital ecosystem, including through protection of privacy and protecting and strengthening the multistakeholder approach to governance that keeps the Internet running for the benefit of all.

India not on the list

India is not a partner for the Declaration.

When asked about it, a senior administration official at a press briefing said, “The hope remains that time is not fully passed yet for India to join. But we’ve been engaged in – in very intensive efforts to have all of these – all of these countries join. ”

“And we’ve been very – frankly, as (senior administration official) said, you know, we’m not at the end of this; the Declaration remains open. And, you know, for some people, it takes time (inaudible) think about it or, frankly, even just see who else has joined. And we remain confident that like-minded countries around the world will – will sign up, ”the official added.

“The Declaration will also remain open after the launch to all partners who are willing to endorse its vision and uphold its principles,” as per a senior official.

The US and it’s partners endorsing this Declaration will work together to implement these principles and to promote this vision globally, while respecting each other’s regulatory autonomy within their own jurisdictions and in accordance with their respective domestic laws and international legal obligations.

Published on

April 29, 2022

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The US, European Union and a host of other global partners have launched the ‘Declaration for the Future of the Internet.’ The declaration is an agreement to support future for the Internet that is an “open, free, global, interoperable, reliable, and secure.” So far, 60 partners have endorsed the Declaration, according to a fact sheet…

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