Home Latest News Addressing New York’s systemic inequalities will be critical to its COVID recovery

Addressing New York’s systemic inequalities will be critical to its COVID recovery

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‘We cannot repeat the mistakes of the past, where the Great Recession, the September 11 attacks and the post-90s recovery exacerbated systemic inequalities instead of addressing them. And it may not be the people who benefit the most from the status quo to set a new direction to the people.’

Adi Talwar

42nd Street and 6th Avenue in Manhattan.

When the pandemic first started, one of the most noticeable things was the lines. But the lines that were there can vary greatly depending on one’s zip code.

Long queues for COVID-19 test in some parts of the city; Often neighborhoods with access to more resources. But some neighborhoods—mostly low-income, mostly black and brown, and largely immigrant communities—see lines for food and emergency aid that lasted for months, and experienced low testing rates, even though they were disproportionately affected by the pandemic. were suffering from.

The lines, and what they were for, became one of the most noticeable signs of racial inequality in New York City. As Yahshanaiah Hill, vice president of Workforce Opportunity Investments at the Upper Manhattan Empowerment Zone Development Corporation (UMEZ), said, “The racial wealth gap is long-standing – the pandemic has made it easier for some to see its damaging reality. “

As we emerge from this pandemic, we know we need to grow our economy and bring opportunity back to New York. But it may not be development that helps those who need it least while leaving those who have suffered the most. We cannot repeat the mistakes of the past, where the Great Recession, the September 11 attacks and the post-90s recovery exacerbated systemic inequalities instead of addressing them. And the people setting a new direction may not be the people who benefit most from the status quo.

We need to engage directly with New Yorkers working on the ground with vulnerable communities in organizations like UMEZ, which is focused on creating economic opportunities for their ultra-local community. We need new voices who are invested in building their lives and communities through a just and shared reform. We need people who represent the full diversity of the city – particularly within communities that have been systematically excluded from the conversation of decision-making. Inclusiveness and equality should be more than a slogan. This vision should be supported by a new process with better results.

Disclaimer: The opinions expressed within this article are the personal opinions of the author. The facts and opinions appearing in the article do not reflect the views of knews.uk and knews.uk does not assume any responsibility or liability for the same.

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