Armed forces chief General Sir Nick Carter defends ‘crazy culture’

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General Sir Nick Carter, chief of the armed forces, says the military needs a ‘bold culture’ because its soldiers must be ‘good at winning on the battlefield’.

  • General set on fire after giving evidence to the House of Commons Defense Committee
  • He said that he never spoke about himself personally and that it is difficult to be a public figure in the modern media world.
  • The statement came after Defense Secretary Ben Wallace summoned senior commanders to discuss the treatment of women in the service.










The commander of the armed forces, General Sir Nick Carter, defended the “crazy culture” interpretation, saying it needed “people who are good at winning on the battlefield”.

The army chief has come under fire after testifying to the House of Commons Defense Committee this week, admitting that the forces are promoting a ‘culture of audacity’.

His appearance came after the Minister of Defense Ben Wallace He urged senior commanders on the Army Board of Directors for a ‘full and candid’ discussion about the treatment of women in service.

Armed forces commander General Sir Nick Carter (pictured) defended the ‘crazy culture’ interpretation, saying it needed ‘people who are good at winning battlefields’.

Carter said in an interview published today: ‘The point I’m trying to make is that we need to have a culture where we grow people who can have close and close contact with an enemy.

‘We have to realize that we’re going to try to create people who are good at winning on the battlefield, okay?’

That doesn’t mean they should behave in an unacceptable or reprehensible way or let laddishism get out of control,” he said. times.

He added that he never referred to himself as himself, but that he ‘necessarily disapproved’.

He also said it was difficult to be a public figure in the modern media world, and admitted that military leaders failed because they did not fail to eliminate “unacceptable behavior that fosters disrespect for other members of the team”. .

When asked about rising tensions on Poland’s border with Belarus, he said an accidental war with Russia was a greater risk than it was during the Cold War.

The army chief came under fire after testifying to the House of Commons Defense Committee (above) this week, acknowledging that the forces were promoting a 'culture of audacity'.

The army chief came under fire after testifying to the House of Commons Defense Committee (above) this week, acknowledging that the forces were promoting a ‘culture of audacity’.

Carter, who was fired at the end of the month, was questioned by the defense subcommittee about a recent report that found that 58% of women serving in the forces and 68% of female veterans had experienced bullying, harassment or discrimination during their careers. .

He said that while maintaining the fighting spirit of the services, the issue should be addressed at the same time.

He told members of the Defense Committee: ‘One reason we promote a culture of generosity is that our soldiers ultimately have to get up close and personal with the enemy.

What you should try and do is square these two outputs.

‘What needs to be done is to make sure that the people who make up these teams understand that if the team is more diverse and more inclusive, they will be a better team and therefore are a part of women and ethnic minorities and everything else. equation.

‘There is a fundamental cultural change that needs to be made there. Personnel committee chairs get it.

The trick is how you cascade that level of commitment through the layers of the chain of command to make people understand that in the face of what we’re talking about, it’s completely unacceptable.

“How to fix this, I think we have an idea, but we’re going to have to stick to it.”

The head of the British armed forces also said it was too early to say that the NATO alliance had suffered a defeat in Afghanistan.

The head of the British armed forces also said it was too early to say that the NATO alliance had suffered a defeat in Afghanistan.

The head of the British armed forces also said that it is too early to say that the NATO alliance has suffered a defeat in Afghanistan.

As evidence, General Sir Nick Carter told the House of Commons Defense committee that the Taliban officials who took over after the Afghan government collapsed in August were very different from the previous Taliban government.

He said that under their rule Afghanistan could become a more inclusive country than it would otherwise be.

He said: ‘Taliban 2.0 is different. There are a lot of people who want to rule in a more modern way in Taliban 2.0, but the political formations are as often divided among themselves.

“If less oppressive elements finally take control…then I think there is no reason to think that Afghanistan may not evolve into a more inclusive country in the next five years than it might otherwise have been.

“I think it’s too early to say that the defeat has happened. Victory here must be measured by the results, not by great military extravagance.’

The head of the British armed forces said that British forces were never defeated on the battlefield in Afghanistan.

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