China bans celebrities from “showcasing wealth” or “extravagant pleasure” on social media

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China has banned its celebrities from showcasing their wealth on social media in the latest crackdown on the entertainment industry.

The Cyberspace Administration of China announced yesterday that celebrities in the country will not be allowed to “show off wealth” or “extravagant pleasure” on social media.

The rules also prevent celebrities from publishing false or private information, provoking fans against other fan groups and from spreading rumors.

In addition, Business Insider reports that social media accounts for both celebrities and fans will be required to follow “public order and good manners, follow public opinion orientation and values, promote core socialist values ​​and maintain a healthy style and taste”.

China has banned its celebrities from showcasing their wealth on social media in the latest crackdown on the entertainment industry.  Pictured: Actress Zheng Shuang, who was fined 299 million yuan ($ 46 million) earlier this year for tax evasion

China has banned its celebrities from showcasing their wealth on social media in the latest crackdown on the entertainment industry. Pictured: Actress Zheng Shuang, who was fined 299 million yuan ($ 46 million) earlier this year for tax evasion

The new rules represent the latest crackdown on celebrity culture in China as the country continues to strengthen its grip on the entertainment industry.

In September, ChinaThe celebrities were warned that they must “oppose the decadent ideas of money-making, hedonism and extreme individualism” at a symposium for the entertainment industry organized by the Communist Party.

The meeting in Peking ran with the slogan: “Love the party, love the country, advocate morality and art.”

It was attended by senior party officials and show business executives who were told they must adhere to social ethics, personal morals and family values.

China sees celebrity culture and the pursuit of wealth as a dangerous Western import that threatens communism because it promotes individualism rather than collectivism.

The participants in the conference were told that they must “deliberately abandoning vulgar and kitschy inferior tastes and deliberately opposing the decadent ideas of money-making, hedonism and extreme individualism, according to state media.

In August, China restricted children to three hours a week of online gambling in what they said was an attempt to curb abuse, with the latest ban representing another step in the CCP's cultural crackdown, led by President Xi Xinping (pictured October 9, 2021) )

In August, China restricted children to three hours a week of online gambling in what they said was an attempt to curb abuse, with the latest ban representing another step in the CCP’s cultural crackdown, led by President Xi Xinping (pictured October 9, 2021) )

And in August, a list of “misbehaving celebrities” who are alleged to have been blacklisted by Beijing circulating on social media in August.

Zhao, 45, and Zheng, 30, were both on the list, along with Chinese-Canadian pop star Kris Wu, who was arrested on suspicion of rape earlier this year.

Last month, a leaked memo revealed that Beijing planned to ban video games that contain homosexual relationships, “feminized men” or allow players to choose between being good or evil.

Officials said the country no longer sees gaming as “entertainment”, but instead as a form of art that must promote what it considers “correct values” and an “exact understanding” of history and culture.

As such, the ban will also ban video games involving the conquest of “barbarians” or attempts to change the history of the Nazis or the empire. Japanese, according to a memo seen by the South China Morning Post.

In August, China restricted children to three hours a week of online gambling in what they said was an attempt to curb abuse, with the latest ban representing another step in the CCP’s cultural crackdown, led by President Xi Xinping.

References to the popular movie star Zhao Wei (pictured 2017) have been censored from major Chinese video streaming sites

References to the popular movie star Zhao Wei (pictured 2017) have been censored from major Chinese video streaming sites

The new memo provided a series of guidelines to game developers in China, or those developing for the Chinese market.

Under the new rules, characters must have a “clear gender”, and intrigue must not have “blurred moral boundaries”.

It added: “If regulators can not say the character’s gender immediately, the characters’ attitude can be considered problematic and red flags raised.”

And elsewhere in the world of entertainment, one of China’s top TV actresses has been fined $ 46 million by Beijing authorities and producers have been ordered not to hire her anymore.

Beijing is on a mission to curb what is called “chaotic fan culture” and celebrity excess after a stream of scandals in recent months that have knocked down China’s biggest entertainer, including singer Kris Wu, who was arrested on suspicion of rape earlier this month.

A commuter walks past a computer and mobile phone RPG game that was announced at a subway station in Beijing last month.  China has announced that it will ban video games involving homosexual relationships,

A commuter walks past a computer and mobile phone RPG game that was announced at a subway station in Beijing last month. China has announced it will ban video games that contain homosexual relationships, “female men” or allow players to choose between being good or evil

Shanghai tax authorities fined Zheng Shuang 299 million yuan ($ 46 million) in August for tax evasion and undeclared income between 2019 and 2020 when he filmed a TV series, according to an online report.

Zheng, 30, became a household name in China after appearing in the 2009 success of the remake of the Taiwanese drama “Meteor Shower”, and a series of successful series and films afterwards.

China’s state television regulator also withdrew Zheng’s offensive television drama and ordered producers not to hire her for future programs.

The state radio, film and television administration added that it had “zero tolerance” for tax evasion, “sky-high salaries” and “yin-yang contracts”, referring to the shady contracts commonly used in Chinese showbiz to hide the actors’ real salaries.

In August, China restricted children to three hours a week of online gambling in what they said was an attempt to curb abuse.  The picture: People playing computer games at an internet café in Beijing on September 10, 2021

In August, China restricted children to three hours a week of online gambling in what they said was an attempt to curb abuse. The picture: People playing computer games at an internet café in Beijing on September 10, 2021

At the same time, references to movie star Zhao Wei were deleted from video streaming sites as Beijing intensifies its campaign against celebrity culture.

State media has gone to extremes and called for changes in China’s entertainment culture.

“For some time now, artists’ moral failures and legal violations, the cultivation of younger idols and ‘chaotic’ fandom have attracted a great deal of attention in society,” the state-run TV channel CCTV said earlier this year.

“We must restore a clean and upright literary and artistic environment for the public.”

Actress Zheng Shuang appeared on a list of

Actress Zheng Shuang appeared on a list of “wrong celebrities” who were allegedly blacklisted by Beijing, which circulated on social media in August. Zhao, 45, and Zheng, 30, were both on the list, along with Chinese-Canadian pop star Kris Wu, who was arrested on suspicion of rape earlier this year.

Back in August, search results for Zhao, a hugely popular actress also known as Vicky Zhao, were censored from major Chinese video streaming sites.

Her name was suddenly removed from the credits for major TV series, while a forum dedicated to the actress on the social media platform Weibo was also mysteriously shut down, as the hashtag “Zhao Wei super-topic closed” received 850 million views.

No official reason was given.

But Zhao and her husband were banned from trading on the Shanghai Stock Exchange earlier this year due to a failed takeover bid in 2016 that authorities said had “disrupted market order”.

China’s cyber regulator released new rules earlier this year banning celebrity rankings and tightening controls over “chaotic” celebrity fan clubs and management agencies.

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