The life of Our Lady Mary Wortley Montagu

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Linn April 1721 At a villa in Wickham, a doctor named Charles Mayland deliberately scratched the skin of a three-year-old girl and rubbed her vagina with a small wound. It was the first time anyone in the UK had been vaccinated against Lucas Miller The Daily Telegraph – And the person who caused it to happen was Mary Wortley Montagu, the mother of the child, the subject of this “emotional” life story. While in Constantinople, Lady Mary discovered the process when she was posted as an ambassador to the Ottoman Empire. This practice, known as “entrepreneurship” at the time, was common in Turkey, where the tumor was inserted into a walnut shell and attached to the patient’s wounds. After about a week, patients develop a mild fever – and a “lifelong immunity” remains.

“It was too late for Mary to use the strategy on her own,” said Thompson The spectator. Once upon a time, “Court Beauty” was infected with smallpox in the 20s – leaving scars on the face and eyebrows, resulting in what people of the time described as the “worm worm”. She campaigned against traditional friends and persuaded Princess Caroline (future wife of George II) to vaccinate royal children. Doctors scoffed at first, but in the fall. It was founded in 1755 by the Royal College of Physicians. In the 1790s, Edward Jenner invented the first smallpox vaccine.

Mrs. Mary’s achievements are not limited to medicine: and her “wonderful” letters from Turkey are by far the most prolific writer. Joe Willett’s quick and artistic biography is a tribute to “one of the most remarkable of the 18th century.”

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